Image

Harrisburg Hip Hop Debate

 

 

“All About Bridging the Gap in Hip Hop Culture”

Hip Hop was formed in an economic struggle that gains over a billion dollars per year. Through the financial up-bring in Hip Hop many artist only seen maybe 1% of the profit. It will take at lease 10 years as a sign artist to become a millionaire and still owning their labels a percentage of their profit.

Hip Hop and its elements has been replaced with Violence, Ego-Tripping,verbal and physical attack on one another.
Male Rap Artist showing off their Overly Masculinity and anger issues towards Black Woman as Black Woman are expressing their anger towards one another.

The Birth of Hip Hip was around the 1970’s in the South and West Bronx. The culture has spread throughout the country as many incorporated their own platform. Hip Hop timeline between 1970 through 1989 have given the voice of freedom, hope and encouragement as it fought against the Oppression, Violences and Racism.

In the mid 90’s the sound of Social Consciousness had vanished. Drugs, Money and Violence had become the new trend called “Gangsta Rap”. The Back Pack Emcees still dominated The Underground Movement but the main focus was to keep the Gangsta’ sound as the primary voice of the culture. Radio Stations had begun to program music in replace of the Dj’s. Record labels had paid radio stations to promote a certain song in heavy rotation around a certain hour of the day in difference Urban Demographic Areas.

In the 2000 /Millennium, the social Media and internet gave many artist a freedom to promote their music. Youtube gave many viewers a visual on the variety of music and sounds worldwide. But also gave an insight and un-sensor on the violence and brutal attack in the Black Community through their music. As many weight in about Hip Hop and Violences there is a group defending the controversy saying its art.

Hip Hop and Rap Music have always influence the black culture whether their dealing with depression or tap into the spirit to wild-out. Hip Hop and Music which its to separate entity has always unified all elements as a form of Peace. On May 20, 2017 in the awake of Hip Hop Appreciation Hip Hop Education will host the 1 Annual Hip Hop Debate. The panelist of Young and Older Hip Hop Artist of all elements who have different views on the state of Hip Hop and the influences on today’s generation will debate of the issues and create a solution.

Hip Hop Debate Part 1
Topics:
Who’s your Boss?
Lawsuit Artist are facing when fighting to become independent.
Should Rappers be held Accountable for their violence lyrics?
Is Mumbling Rap Acceptable or UnAcceptable?
The Un-Expectance of Dark-Skin Woman.
Don’t Blame Hip Hop for the violence in the community.
Bridging the Gap

Image

Hip Hop Appreciation week 2017

Hip Hop Appreciation week  MAY 15TH-MAY 21ST 2017

I am asking all Hip Hop Educators and Scholars to donate their time and educate a youth on the History of Hip Hop and its elements. If we the preservers of Hip Hop we must continue educating the next generation without judgement and personal opinon.
-Queen Michele

 

 

 

Image

SisHer in Hip Hop Toni Blackman

Its tough being apart of a Male Dominated movement were you have to compete vocally towards another female Emcee by trashing and dragging her through the mud. Battling is the part of Hip Hop Culture however female Emcees are encourage to attack then to display their lyrical skills.

Females in Hip Hop represent more then music they represent a movement of Emcees, Dancers, Graffiti Writers, Dj’s, Educators, Activist, Philosopher, Professors, Psychologist, Therapist, and more.

Today we Celebrate our Hip Hop SisHer, Our Queen:

Toni Blackman (Hip Hop Educator and Historian)
Please read her Bio.

Photo:By Keith Rogers

Toni Blackman is a poet, rap lyricist and actress. She was the first Hip Hop artist selected to work as a Cultural Ambassador traveling with the US Department of State. Toni has traveled throughout Africa, Europe, and Southeast Asia, often working in some of the world’s most war-torn nation states to help bring reconciliation and rehabilitation to those regions. Affectionately known as America’s Hip Hop Ambassador, Blackman has visited 22 different countries and worked in others via digital satellite.

Highly respected as the founder of Freestyle Union, a cipher workshop that uses freestyling as a tool to encourage social responsibility, Lyrical Embassy, a project which she runs, serves as the umbrella for Freestyle Union and for Rhyme Like A Girl – an initiative for girls and women. A former Echoing Green Fellow and Soros Fellow, her work promotes diplomacy and self-expression through the use of cutting-edge personal development technique.

Recognized as a pioneer in Hip Hop theater and education, this award-winning artist has shared the stage with everyone from Erykah Badu, the Roots, Wu Tang, Sonia Sanchez, Sara McLachlan and Rickie Lee Jones. Her book Inner-Course (Villard/Random House), which was released in 2003, appears in the award-winning anthology Live Through This (Seven Stories Press, 2008), her memoir, “Travels of a Lyrical Ambassador”, will be released on The Feminist Press late 2010 and she is a contributor to Jay Z: The Artist, The Man, The Visionary. In 2009 she was featured in VH1’s Future of Black History ad campaign, in the Smithsonian Folklife Festival and was presented by 651 Arts. Toni’s recent travel included Italy, France and Azerbaijan (Baku) where she spoke at the Pio Manzu International Conference, which was held last October 24 and which featured Mikhail Gorbachev as one of the prime organizers – an event during which she has had the serendipity to befriend a woman from the UN who also introduced her to a couple from Baku. Out of that cultural exchange came up an opportunity for her to go to Baku and worked there on a project which involved performing and developing awareness of Hip Hop at an international level. Additionally, she is producing a Rhyme Like A Girl project with teen girls from Liberia, Sudan, Somalia and the U.S. during her artist residency with Jefferson Arts Center in Virginia, and also completing related projects for the Travels of a Lyrical Ambassador brand.

Website http://www.toniblackman.com
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ToniBlackman4/

Image

Hip Hop Debate (Harrisburg PA)

COMING 2017

The question is who’s right or wrong? Everyone opinion matters but the question is who have the actual facts?

Hip Hop Debate Part 1 will feature a panelist of Young and Older Hip Hop Artist of all elements who have different views on the state of Hip Hop and the language of todays Artist.

*Hip Hop Debate part 1 Topics:

  • Is Nigga-ology the cause of Violence or Rap Lyrics?
  • Who’s your Boss?
  • Is Mumbling Rap acceptable or UnAcceptable?
  • Masculinity in Hip Hop.

 

Image

Thank You Harrisburg High Media/Production Class

Thank You Mr. Cooper for allowing me to speak with your student on Hip Hop History and Education. I really enjoyed the open conversation, Q/A and debate on the state of Hip Hop and Rap Music with the students. HAPPY HIP HOP HISTORY MONTH

Image

Hip Hop is more than Music

Ever since Rap Music has transitioned into Mainstream Corporate America the elements have been replaced with Misogyny, Money and Violence. The stereotypes and misleading of Hip Hop Culture has set an unethical view to the world that the movement is dangerous and hazardous to the youth. Emcees are the voices of storytelling and healing the wounds that Black America has had to endure from Social injustice, Racism and Poverty. When Violence, Crime and Drugs became the new sound of rap music there was a major shift in behaviors and mindset. The Lyrics became belligerent with images of gun-clapping, blood-shedding and genocide in the black community. Many believe the horrifying images and lyrics of Rappers are setting back the Black Youth.

Hip Hop was formed in the 1970’s out of the Civil Rights Movement and the voices of Black and Latinos who lived in Ground Zero of the burning Bronx. The South Bronx was in crisis with the widespread burning buildings set by landlords to collect insurance money. The Decay of the Bronx community has caused an Economic Depression as many businesses and property owners were relocating into the White suburban areas. The Financial Crisis and infrastructure of the abandoned building left by the Property owners was shifted into a new hub for gang members and house parties. The gangs dominated their territories and went to war with their rivals, however, they protected their community, stood up against the social injustice and confronted city officials on the condition of the South Bronx. Members of the gangs held a large meeting to bring peace as the birth of Hip Hop was building its foundation.

During the crack era, teens who later became Hip Hop legends had created an underground moment. The up-rise of Social Changes and transformation of the Bronx had spread to other parts of the world that a new movement of self-expression was born. The origins of Hip Hop originated from House Parties into creative Elements of Graffiti, DJ (Disk Jockey), Breaking, Emcees, and Knowledge. The Elements of Hip Hop plays an important part of the culture from extending of the Break Beat by the Dj’s, Emcees battling or giving a shout out over the Microphone and the B-boys taking over 50% of the floor with their dance moves. The Graffiti writers created the promotional flyers, beautified the community, and sent messages on the trains through art.

Fashion had changed from the 70’s, Cut Sleeve Jackets to the Sweat Suits, Chuck Taylor’s, Kangos, Cazles, and Bomber Jackets. Jheri Curl was a popular hairstyle to many Black and Afro Latinos. In the 80’s, at this time, emcees became the focal point of the culture and change the content of flow and delivery as an artist.

Around 1986, the powerful voices of Emcees delivered lyrics of Black Empowerment, Racism, and Economics. This Era was considered The Revolutionary Movement and the shortest era in Hip Hop History. Emcees continue to challenge the issues and being the voice of the streets. The West Coast rappers shed a new light on the issues of police brutality and gang violence. Even though the west coast represented the gang-life, they also expressed the same Social issues related to the East Coast.

In the mid 90’s the sound of Social Consciousness had vanished. Drugs, Money and Violence had become the new trend called “gangsta’ rap”. The Back Pack Emcees still dominated The Underground Movement but the main focus was to keep the gangsta’ sound as the primary voice of the culture. Radio Stations had begun to program music in replace of the Dj’s. Record labels had paid radio stations to promote a certain song in heavy rotation around a certain hour of the day in difference Urban Demographic Areas. It seemed like the same song was being played every 13 minutes targeting a younger audience from the hours of 3:00pm-7:00pm.

In the high-light of Chicago, Philadelphia, Los Angeles and other cities that are dealing with violence, why aren’t there any songs that can heal these cities and put it into heavy rotation on every FM radio station? In the late 80’s and 90’s, the Black community was fighting Crimes and in the wake of the violence KRS One (Stop The Violence Movement) with various of Emcees deliver a power song called “Self Destruction, Slick Rick “Hey Young World” and the West Coast Rap All-Stars “We’re All in the Same Gang”. Today’s generation believes in becoming a successful Rapper, the lyrics must include genocide, corruption and verbal attack on Black woman. Artists promoting a false narrative by displaying a life they never lived and prison sentences they never served.

Positive music and the uplifting of the generation was never a factor, but rather use of lab rats. Music and instrumental beat taps into the body of human life, the affects can be positive or negative. A certain sound or sound effect can change one’s feelings and thoughts. It also can put the person into a deep thought and if interrupted it can be scary. When artists deliver their lyrics of violence it can cause a person to react in a violent way.

There are rap artists who make music about poverty, homelessness, and financial hardship, as other can relate. Our youth has stated how a rap song brought them out of depression and changed their lives for the better, especially children who lost their parents or dealing with a personal crisis in their lives. The purpose of Hip-Hop Culture was to re-inform and help shape the lives that are being affected by a crisis through music, art and dance. All Elements of Hip Hop still serve a purpose and a need to the culture, Hip Hop Culture will continue advocating peace and unity through the Streets, Schools and Universities. Hip Hop Culture is more than music; it is a movement that speaks a universal language.

Michele Hairston Hip Hop Educator/ Historian