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Harrisburg Hip Hop Debate

 

 

“All About Bridging the Gap in Hip Hop Culture”

Hip Hop was formed in an economic struggle that gains over a billion dollars per year. Through the financial up-bring in Hip Hop many artist only seen maybe 1% of the profit. It will take at lease 10 years as a sign artist to become a millionaire and still owning their labels a percentage of their profit.

Hip Hop and its elements has been replaced with Violence, Ego-Tripping,verbal and physical attack on one another.
Male Rap Artist showing off their Overly Masculinity and anger issues towards Black Woman as Black Woman are expressing their anger towards one another.

The Birth of Hip Hip was around the 1970’s in the South and West Bronx. The culture has spread throughout the country as many incorporated their own platform. Hip Hop timeline between 1970 through 1989 have given the voice of freedom, hope and encouragement as it fought against the Oppression, Violences and Racism.

In the mid 90’s the sound of Social Consciousness had vanished. Drugs, Money and Violence had become the new trend called “Gangsta Rap”. The Back Pack Emcees still dominated The Underground Movement but the main focus was to keep the Gangsta’ sound as the primary voice of the culture. Radio Stations had begun to program music in replace of the Dj’s. Record labels had paid radio stations to promote a certain song in heavy rotation around a certain hour of the day in difference Urban Demographic Areas.

In the 2000 /Millennium, the social Media and internet gave many artist a freedom to promote their music. Youtube gave many viewers a visual on the variety of music and sounds worldwide. But also gave an insight and un-sensor on the violence and brutal attack in the Black Community through their music. As many weight in about Hip Hop and Violences there is a group defending the controversy saying its art.

Hip Hop and Rap Music have always influence the black culture whether their dealing with depression or tap into the spirit to wild-out. Hip Hop and Music which its to separate entity has always unified all elements as a form of Peace. On May 20, 2017 in the awake of Hip Hop Appreciation Hip Hop Education will host the 1 Annual Hip Hop Debate. The panelist of Young and Older Hip Hop Artist of all elements who have different views on the state of Hip Hop and the influences on today’s generation will debate of the issues and create a solution.

Hip Hop Debate Part 1
Topics:
Who’s your Boss?
Lawsuit Artist are facing when fighting to become independent.
Should Rappers be held Accountable for their violence lyrics?
Is Mumbling Rap Acceptable or UnAcceptable?
The Un-Expectance of Dark-Skin Woman.
Don’t Blame Hip Hop for the violence in the community.
Bridging the Gap

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Its tough being apart of a Male Dominated movement were you have to compete vocally towards another female Emcee by trashing and dragging her through the mud. Battling is the part of Hip Hop Culture however female Emcees are encourage to attack then to display their lyrical skills.

Females in Hip Hop represent more then music they represent a movement of Emcees, Dancers, Graffiti Writers, Dj’s, Educators, Activist, Philosopher, Professors, Psychologist, Therapist, and more.

Today we Celebrate our Hip Hop SisHer, Our Queen: Roxanne Shante

Hip Hop Legend and Icon

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SisHer In Hip Hop Martha Diaz

Its tough being apart of a Male Dominated movement were you have to compete vocally towards another female Emcee by trashing and dragging her through the mud. Battling is the part of Hip Hop Culture however female Emcees are encourage to attack then to display their lyrical skills.

Females in Hip Hop represent more then music they represent a movement of Emcees, Dancers, Graffiti Writers, Dj’s, Educators, Activist, Philosopher, Professors, Psychologist, Therapist, and more.

Today we Celebrate our Hip Hop SisHer, Our Queen: Martha Diaz

Martha Diaz is the founder of the Hip-Hop Education Center. She’s an award winning community organizer, social entrepreneur, media producer, archivist, curator, and professor at New York University. For two decades, Diaz has traversed between the hip-hop entertainment industry, non-profit sector and academia. She has worked on Hollywood productions and produced TV shows, documentaries, music videos, and PSA’s. Diaz served as the executive director of the Hip-Hop Association, where she produced and curated the Hip-Hop Odyssey International Film Festival and Hip-Hop Education Summit.

In 2010, Diaz founded the Hip-Hop Education Center, housed at NYU’s Metropolitan Center for Research on Equity and the Transformation of Schools, to cultivate and professionalize the field of hip-hop-based education. She is co-editor of the Hip-Hop Education Guidebook, Vol. I (Hip-Hop Association, 2007) and Rebel Music: Resistance Through Hip Hop and Punk (Information Age Publishing, 2015). Among her fellowships and residencies, Diaz served as resident of NJ Performing Arts Center’s Alternate Routes Program, Fellow at NYU Reynolds Program for Social Entrepreneurship, Senior Fellow at the Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation – National Museum of American History, and Hip-Hop Scholar at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture – NY Public Library. In 2014, Diaz was appointed as Columbia University Community Scholar, where she collaborates with the Institute for Urban and Minority Education and the Center for Justice. Her most recent media project is the award winning NAS: Time Is Illmatic documentary. Diaz is a Cabinet Member of the U.S. Department of Arts and Culture, a citizen-led, policy-oriented leadership group.

 

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SisHer in Hip Hop Toni Blackman

Its tough being apart of a Male Dominated movement were you have to compete vocally towards another female Emcee by trashing and dragging her through the mud. Battling is the part of Hip Hop Culture however female Emcees are encourage to attack then to display their lyrical skills.

Females in Hip Hop represent more then music they represent a movement of Emcees, Dancers, Graffiti Writers, Dj’s, Educators, Activist, Philosopher, Professors, Psychologist, Therapist, and more.

Today we Celebrate our Hip Hop SisHer, Our Queen:

Toni Blackman (Hip Hop Educator and Historian)
Please read her Bio.

Photo:By Keith Rogers

Toni Blackman is a poet, rap lyricist and actress. She was the first Hip Hop artist selected to work as a Cultural Ambassador traveling with the US Department of State. Toni has traveled throughout Africa, Europe, and Southeast Asia, often working in some of the world’s most war-torn nation states to help bring reconciliation and rehabilitation to those regions. Affectionately known as America’s Hip Hop Ambassador, Blackman has visited 22 different countries and worked in others via digital satellite.

Highly respected as the founder of Freestyle Union, a cipher workshop that uses freestyling as a tool to encourage social responsibility, Lyrical Embassy, a project which she runs, serves as the umbrella for Freestyle Union and for Rhyme Like A Girl – an initiative for girls and women. A former Echoing Green Fellow and Soros Fellow, her work promotes diplomacy and self-expression through the use of cutting-edge personal development technique.

Recognized as a pioneer in Hip Hop theater and education, this award-winning artist has shared the stage with everyone from Erykah Badu, the Roots, Wu Tang, Sonia Sanchez, Sara McLachlan and Rickie Lee Jones. Her book Inner-Course (Villard/Random House), which was released in 2003, appears in the award-winning anthology Live Through This (Seven Stories Press, 2008), her memoir, “Travels of a Lyrical Ambassador”, will be released on The Feminist Press late 2010 and she is a contributor to Jay Z: The Artist, The Man, The Visionary. In 2009 she was featured in VH1’s Future of Black History ad campaign, in the Smithsonian Folklife Festival and was presented by 651 Arts. Toni’s recent travel included Italy, France and Azerbaijan (Baku) where she spoke at the Pio Manzu International Conference, which was held last October 24 and which featured Mikhail Gorbachev as one of the prime organizers – an event during which she has had the serendipity to befriend a woman from the UN who also introduced her to a couple from Baku. Out of that cultural exchange came up an opportunity for her to go to Baku and worked there on a project which involved performing and developing awareness of Hip Hop at an international level. Additionally, she is producing a Rhyme Like A Girl project with teen girls from Liberia, Sudan, Somalia and the U.S. during her artist residency with Jefferson Arts Center in Virginia, and also completing related projects for the Travels of a Lyrical Ambassador brand.

Website http://www.toniblackman.com
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ToniBlackman4/

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Chance the Rapper Donates $1million Dollars

Hip Hop is more than Music, it’s a movement!!!

Chance the Rapper, a Chicago native has donated $1 Million Dollars from his ticket Sales to the Chicago Public school Foundation “for arts and enrichment” programming on Monday March 6,2017. The Emcee is asking others to join the fight “Take Care of Chicago Kids”.

Respect to Chance the Rapper, The 5th Element of Hip Hop Culture.

 

Video from ABC News

We do not own

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MC Lyte

Its tough being apart of a Male Dominated movement were you have to compete vocally towards another female Emcee by trashing and dragging her through the mud. Battling is the part of Hip Hop Culture however female Emcees are encourage to attack then to display their lyrical skills.

Females in Hip Hop represent more then music they represent a movement of Emcees, Dancers, Graffiti Writers, Dj’s, Educators, Activist, Philosopher, Professors, Psychologist, Therapist, and more.

Today we Celebrate our Hip Hop SisHer, Our Queen: Roxanne Shante

Hip Hop Legend and Icon:Mc Lyte

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Hip Hop Debate (Harrisburg PA)

COMING 2017

The question is who’s right or wrong? Everyone opinion matters but the question is who have the actual facts?

Hip Hop Debate Part 1 will feature a panelist of Young and Older Hip Hop Artist of all elements who have different views on the state of Hip Hop and the language of todays Artist.

*Hip Hop Debate part 1 Topics:

  • Is Nigga-ology the cause of Violence or Rap Lyrics?
  • Who’s your Boss?
  • Is Mumbling Rap acceptable or UnAcceptable?
  • Masculinity in Hip Hop.